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Set New Standards and Expectations

Ceres has a long history of setting new expectations for leadership by investors and businesses on sustainability disclosure, performance and corporate governance. We will continue to define best practices on sustainability and governance in the 21st century and ensure there is widespread adoption and accountability.

Set New StandardsIn order to meet the new challenges of the 21st century, companies and investors must ask new questions and set new standards for success. Ceres has a long history of setting new standards and expectations for leadership by investors and businesses on sustainability disclosure, performance and corporate governance. We will continue to define best practices on sustainability and governance in the 21st century and ensure there is widespread adoption and accountability.

How We Will Get There:

  1. Ensure boards of directors at all companies have explicit oversight over climate change and other sustainability risks and integrate sustainability into performance evaluations and incentive packages of CEOs and senior executives.
  2. Ensure all companies are issuing GRI-based reports with specific performance goals and targets for operations, products and services, supply chains and employee programs.
  3. Benchmark and rank the world's 500 largest companies in carbon-intensive sectors, financial services, consumer goods and technology on climate change and other sustainability practices.
  4. Lead a collaborative effort to define what a 21st century sustainable corporation should look like, including the 21st century "utility of the future."


Resources

2003 Institutional Investor Summit on Climate Risk Final Report
Dec 01, 2003
Major pension fund managers and institutional investors, along with representatives of leading Wall Street fund management firms, met for the first time to consider the potential risks to their portfolios posed by climate change at the Institutional Investor Summit on Climate Risk at the United Nations on November 21, 2003. This report reviews what participants discussed.
Institutional Investors' Expectations of Corporate Climate Risk Management
Jan 11, 2012
January 2012 - This report indicates the key climate change-related practices that investors expect companies to undertake based on our understanding of best practice management of climate change risks and opportunities. It also outlines the actions that investors are prepared to undertake on this topic.
Fuel Economy Focus: Industry Perspectives on 2020
Apr 04, 2012
In collaboration with Citi Investment Research and the Investor Network on Climate Risk, Ceres, along with Oakland University’s School of Business Administration, Baum and Associates, and Meszler Engineering Services simulated the impact that the proposed U.S. Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions program might have on the industry in 2020. The analysis is meant to provide investors with a framework for evaluating the potential industry impact from tightening regulations.
Physical Risks from Climate Change: A guide for companies and investors on disclosure and management of climate impacts
May 31, 2012
The year 2011 set records for economic losses and insured losses caused by natural catastrophes, with extreme weather events accounting for 90 percent of the disasters and eight of the 10 most costly, resulting in overall losses of more than $148 billion and insured losses of more than $55 billion. Climate change is predicted to increase these trends.
Restoring Flows: Financing the Next Generation of Water Systems A Strategy for Coalition Building
May 11, 2012
In this report, Ceres and American Rivers join forces to highlight the importance of bringing together environmentalists, economists, water utilities, water users, financial institutions, foundations, investors and labor groups to create opportunities for the creation of shared pursuits beyond the boundaries of politics, watersheds and economic sectors that typically define our relationship to water.