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Set New Standards and Expectations

Ceres has a long history of setting new expectations for leadership by investors and businesses on sustainability disclosure, performance and corporate governance. We will continue to define best practices on sustainability and governance in the 21st century and ensure there is widespread adoption and accountability.

Set New StandardsIn order to meet the new challenges of the 21st century, companies and investors must ask new questions and set new standards for success. Ceres has a long history of setting new standards and expectations for leadership by investors and businesses on sustainability disclosure, performance and corporate governance. We will continue to define best practices on sustainability and governance in the 21st century and ensure there is widespread adoption and accountability.

How We Will Get There:

  1. Ensure boards of directors at all companies have explicit oversight over climate change and other sustainability risks and integrate sustainability into performance evaluations and incentive packages of CEOs and senior executives.
  2. Ensure all companies are issuing GRI-based reports with specific performance goals and targets for operations, products and services, supply chains and employee programs.
  3. Benchmark and rank the world's 500 largest companies in carbon-intensive sectors, financial services, consumer goods and technology on climate change and other sustainability practices.
  4. Lead a collaborative effort to define what a 21st century sustainable corporation should look like, including the 21st century "utility of the future."


Resources

Reclaiming Transparency in a Changing Climate
Jun 03, 2009
June 2009 – This report, by Ceres, CEES and Environmental Defense Fund, reviews over 6,000 SEC filings by S&P 500 companies from 1995 to 2008. While the study finds some modest improvement in climate risk disclosure since 1995, in 2008 75% of annual reports filed by S&P 500 corporations failed to even mention climate change and only 5% articulated a strategy for managing climate-related risks.
Facility Reporting Project: Sustainability Reporting Guidance
Mar 01, 2005
Developed in 2004, Ceres' Facility Reporting Project's guidance is a tool to support facilities (and their parent organizations) in voluntary public reporting of facility-level sustainability performance information. It consists of environmental, social, and economic indicators relevant to local stakeholders, and provides step-by-step guidance to assist in the reporting process.
More Jobs Per Gallon: How Strong Fuel Economy/GHG Standards Will Fuel American Jobs
Jul 30, 2011
This Ceres report focuses on the economic impacts of strengthening fuel economy and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission standards for passenger vehicles sold in the United States. The analysis finds that stronger standards—more miles and fewer emissions per gallon—would lead to greater economic and job growth, both within the auto industry and in the broader economy as a whole.
2010 Investor Summit on Climate Risk Final Report
Feb 10, 2010
To highlight the enormous opportunities of this transition and to assess the need for climate change policy, Ceres, the United Nations Office for Partnerships, and the United Nations Foundation co-hosted the fourth Investor Summit on Climate Risk at the United Nations on January 14, 2010. The Summit brought together more than 520 financial, corporate, and investor leaders with more than $22 trillion in combined assets. Speakers from the investment community, business, labor, and government highlighted the fact that private investment in climate change solutions is crucial for addressing the climate crisis and will not happen at the necessary scale without strong climate and energy policies that limit emissions and put a price on carbon.
2005 Investor Summit on Climate Risk – Final Report
May 10, 2005
More than 400 institutional investors, fund managers, financial advisors, and other experts from fifteen countries and four continents gathered at the United Nations on May 10, 2005 for the 2005 Institutional Investor Summit on Climate Risk. The participants engaged in peer-to-peer discussions with leading scientists, investors, and business leaders on how investors can minimize climate risk and maximize opportunities, especially from new clean energy technologies.