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Set New Standards and Expectations

Ceres has a long history of setting new expectations for leadership by investors and businesses on sustainability disclosure, performance and corporate governance. We will continue to define best practices on sustainability and governance in the 21st century and ensure there is widespread adoption and accountability.

Set New StandardsIn order to meet the new challenges of the 21st century, companies and investors must ask new questions and set new standards for success. Ceres has a long history of setting new standards and expectations for leadership by investors and businesses on sustainability disclosure, performance and corporate governance. We will continue to define best practices on sustainability and governance in the 21st century and ensure there is widespread adoption and accountability.

How We Will Get There:

  1. Ensure boards of directors at all companies have explicit oversight over climate change and other sustainability risks and integrate sustainability into performance evaluations and incentive packages of CEOs and senior executives.
  2. Ensure all companies are issuing GRI-based reports with specific performance goals and targets for operations, products and services, supply chains and employee programs.
  3. Benchmark and rank the world's 500 largest companies in carbon-intensive sectors, financial services, consumer goods and technology on climate change and other sustainability practices.
  4. Lead a collaborative effort to define what a 21st century sustainable corporation should look like, including the 21st century "utility of the future."


Resources

Global Climate Disclosure Framework for Oil & Gas Companies
Mar 10, 2010
March 2010 - In general, companies in the Oil and Gas industry are more transparent than the average of other sectors in respect of their climate-related performances. Nonetheless, the information provided by most companies remains inadequate to fully gauge the exposure of companies to evolving climate change related pressures. This report outlines the main areas of reporting necessary to allow investors to fully assess the impacts of climate-related changes on Oil and Gas companies.
Multiplying Our Impact: Ceres 2009-2010 Annual Report
Nov 20, 2010
November 2010 - This Ceres Annual Report highlights the remarkable achievements that we have made over the past year in working to build a sustainable global economy. It highlights our successes in four of today's most pressing sustainability issues: the scarcity of water, the need to replace fossil fuels with clean energy, supporting human rights and combating climate change. Ceres' Annual Report also includes case studies of the achievements we have made with our partners, including Oxfam America, Ford Motor Co. and the California Public Employees' Retirement System.
2006 Corporate Governance and Climate Change: Making the Connection
Mar 20, 2006
March 2006 - The 2006 Corporate Governance and Climate Change: Making the Connection report includes a 30-page summary report comprised of the executive summary, the climate governance scoring criteria, the 100 company scores and sector-specific findings. The report also includes 2- to 3-page profiles on each of the companies evaluated.
Benchmarking Air Emissions of the 100 Largest Electric Generation Owners in the U.S. - 2004
Apr 20, 2004
April 2004 - This 2004 report from Ceres, the Natural Resources Defense Council and the Public Service Enterprise Group compares CO2 and other emissions from the country's 100 largest power companies. The report showed a 25 percent increase in CO2 emissions from power generating companies from 1990 to 2002.
Benchmarking Air Emissions of the 100 Largest Electric Generation Owners in the U.S. - 2000
Mar 20, 2002
March 2002 - This report examines and compares air pollutant emissions of the 100 largest power producers in the U.S., based on year 2000 ownership and emissions data. These producers own about 2,000 power plants and account for about 90 percent of reported electricity generation and emissions.