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Set New Standards and Expectations

Ceres has a long history of setting new expectations for leadership by investors and businesses on sustainability disclosure, performance and corporate governance. We will continue to define best practices on sustainability and governance in the 21st century and ensure there is widespread adoption and accountability.

Set New StandardsIn order to meet the new challenges of the 21st century, companies and investors must ask new questions and set new standards for success. Ceres has a long history of setting new standards and expectations for leadership by investors and businesses on sustainability disclosure, performance and corporate governance. We will continue to define best practices on sustainability and governance in the 21st century and ensure there is widespread adoption and accountability.

How We Will Get There:

  1. Ensure boards of directors at all companies have explicit oversight over climate change and other sustainability risks and integrate sustainability into performance evaluations and incentive packages of CEOs and senior executives.
  2. Ensure all companies are issuing GRI-based reports with specific performance goals and targets for operations, products and services, supply chains and employee programs.
  3. Benchmark and rank the world's 500 largest companies in carbon-intensive sectors, financial services, consumer goods and technology on climate change and other sustainability practices.
  4. Lead a collaborative effort to define what a 21st century sustainable corporation should look like, including the 21st century "utility of the future."


Resources

Physical Risks from Climate Change: A guide for companies and investors on disclosure and management of climate impacts
May 31, 2012
The year 2011 set records for economic losses and insured losses caused by natural catastrophes, with extreme weather events accounting for 90 percent of the disasters and eight of the 10 most costly, resulting in overall losses of more than $148 billion and insured losses of more than $55 billion. Climate change is predicted to increase these trends.
Restoring Flows: Financing the Next Generation of Water Systems A Strategy for Coalition Building
May 11, 2012
In this report, Ceres and American Rivers join forces to highlight the importance of bringing together environmentalists, economists, water utilities, water users, financial institutions, foundations, investors and labor groups to create opportunities for the creation of shared pursuits beyond the boundaries of politics, watersheds and economic sectors that typically define our relationship to water.
Investor Risks from Oil Shale Development
May 30, 2012
May 2012 - The Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management (BLM) recently proposed limiting federal leases for development of oil shale to Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) leases instead of commercial leases. Given the many risks surrounding oil shale development, including technological uncertainties, regulatory risks, and water constraints, BLM’s proposed RD&D approach makes sense. Investors should be similarly cautious in evaluating future investment in this technology.
Clearing the Waters: A Review of Corporate Water Risk Disclosure in SEC Filings
Jun 18, 2012
New Sector Analysis added: Ceres has added sector-by-sector analyses for each of the eight sectors reviewed in this report. Download this new version. This report finds that though overall corporate disclosures of water-related risks in financial filings have increased since 2009, much reporting remains weak and inconsistent especially in regard to data on overall water use, financial exposure and potential supply chain risks.
Global Investor Survey on Climate Change Report 2011
Jul 25, 2012
This report provides the results of the second global survey of investment practices coordinated by the three investor networks on climate change – the IIGCC, based in Europe, INCR, based in North America and the Australia/New Zealand IGCC. The report provides an overview of the leading investment practices around the world on climate change and analyses the drivers for those practices.