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Change the Rules of the Game

Companies and investors need clear policies that reward sustainability performance. our capital market structures are biased towards short-term financial performance. The lack of carbon-reducing regulations in the U.S. for example has allowed companies to emit greenhouse gases at no cost, thus rewarding big emitters and penalizing more efficient businesses. Far greater sustainability gains can be achieved if smart policies are adopted that send clear market signals encouraging clean solutions with a long-term perspective.

Rules of the Game

Companies and investors need clear policies that reward sustainability performance. our capital market structures are biased towards short-term financial performance. The lack of carbon-reducing regulations in the U.S. for example has allowed companies to emit greenhouse gases at no cost, thus rewarding big emitters and penalizing more efficient businesses. Far greater sustainability gains can be achieved if smart policies are adopted that send clear market signals encouraging clean solutions with a long-term perspective.

Ceres will advocate for more sustainable policies in the U.S. and around the world as well as build investor and business support for policies and regulations that reduce sustainability risks and protect long-term interests.

How We Will Get There:

  1. Build business leader support for national and global climate and energy policies.
  2. Gain passage of a new international climate treaty, including a binding reduction target based on the latest scientific findings by the internationally-recognized IPCC.
  3. Eliminate tax incentives and government subsidies for fossil fuel technologies and carbon-intensive projects.
  4. Gain passage of energy efficiency policies to double the historic rate of efficiency improvements and national renewable policies so that at least 20 percent of the nation's electricity comes from renewable power by 2020 and 30 percent by 2030.
  5. Gain passage of national climate change legislation to achieve a reduction in GHG emissions of at least 25 percent below 1990 levels by 2020 and 80 percent by 2050.


Resources:

Incorporating Environmental, Social and Governance Factors into Investing: A Survey of Investment Consultant Practices
Oct 05, 2012
This report shows that investment consultants retained by major asset owners such as pension funds, foundations and endowments have generally not considered environmental, social and governance (“ESG”) risks and opportunities as they advise their investor clients on their portfolios.
Stormy Future for U.S. Property/Casualty Insurers: The Growing Costs and Risks of Extreme Weather Events
Sep 20, 2012
This Ceres report examines how extreme weather trends may be a harbinger of significant challenges ahead for a sector in which many companies are already confronting profitability and growth challenges. This analysis is based on a careful review of U.S. property/casualty insurance industry financial results as reported by A. M. Best Company in early 2012.
Sustainable Extraction? An Analysis of SEC Disclosure by Major Oil & Gas Companies on Climate Risk and Deepwater Drilling Risk
Aug 02, 2012
Disclosure of material business risk is a core underpinning of the modern global economy’s health. A new report says that investors aren’t getting a clear picture from companies of just how deep the material risks are.
The Road to 2020: Corporate Progress on the Ceres Roadmap for Sustainability
Apr 25, 2012
The Road to 2020: Corporate Progress on The Ceres Roadmap for Sustainability assesses how U.S. businesses are progressing on sustainability and uses as a framework, The 21st Century Corporation: The Ceres Roadmap for Sustainability—a guide for integrating sustainability across a company’s entire enterprise. Specifically, it evaluates where 600 large publicly traded companies stand on sustainability issues in terms of governance, stakeholder engagement, disclosure and performance.
New Jobs - Cleaner Air (Part II): An investment in American Businesses and American Jobs
Nov 17, 2011
In February 2011, Ceres issued a study demonstrating how new air pollution rules proposed for the electric power sector by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will provide long-term economic benefits across much of the United States. This report supplements this economic study by highlighting specific case examples of the companies involved in building a modern generating fleet. It breaks the supply chain into its component pieces and shows the vital role that American workers play in installing and maintaining sophisticated emission control systems.