E-mail Sign-up
 
You are here: Home What We Do Change the Rules of the Game
Document Actions
  • Print this Print this
  • Email this page

Change the Rules of the Game

Companies and investors need clear policies that reward sustainability performance. our capital market structures are biased towards short-term financial performance. The lack of carbon-reducing regulations in the U.S. for example has allowed companies to emit greenhouse gases at no cost, thus rewarding big emitters and penalizing more efficient businesses. Far greater sustainability gains can be achieved if smart policies are adopted that send clear market signals encouraging clean solutions with a long-term perspective.

Rules of the Game

Companies and investors need clear policies that reward sustainability performance. our capital market structures are biased towards short-term financial performance. The lack of carbon-reducing regulations in the U.S. for example has allowed companies to emit greenhouse gases at no cost, thus rewarding big emitters and penalizing more efficient businesses. Far greater sustainability gains can be achieved if smart policies are adopted that send clear market signals encouraging clean solutions with a long-term perspective.

Ceres will advocate for more sustainable policies in the U.S. and around the world as well as build investor and business support for policies and regulations that reduce sustainability risks and protect long-term interests.

How We Will Get There:

  1. Build business leader support for national and global climate and energy policies.
  2. Gain passage of a new international climate treaty, including a binding reduction target based on the latest scientific findings by the internationally-recognized IPCC.
  3. Eliminate tax incentives and government subsidies for fossil fuel technologies and carbon-intensive projects.
  4. Gain passage of energy efficiency policies to double the historic rate of efficiency improvements and national renewable policies so that at least 20 percent of the nation's electricity comes from renewable power by 2020 and 30 percent by 2030.
  5. Gain passage of national climate change legislation to achieve a reduction in GHG emissions of at least 25 percent below 1990 levels by 2020 and 80 percent by 2050.


Resources:

Inaction on Climate Change: The Cost to Taxpayers
Oct 28, 2013
When we examine the full costs of public programs that pay for disaster relief and recovery from extreme weather events—ad hoc disaster assistance appropriations, flood insurance, crop insurance, wildfire protection, and state run “residual market” insurance programs—we can begin to understand the price to U.S. taxpayers of inaction on climate change.
Assessing Water System Revenue Risk: Considerations for Market Analysts
Aug 07, 2013
Water utilities are on the brink of extraordinary investments to replace aging infrastructure—the Environmental Protection Agency estimates that by 2030, capital expenditures of more than $300 billion will be needed to safeguard drinking water. Yet this investment comes at a time when Americans’ water use habits are changing—resulting in considerable uncertainty for water systems planning capital programs to replace or expand their assets.
Proxy Voting for Sustainability
May 21, 2013
This report serves as a resource guide to help global investors respond to environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues that are increasingly the subject of shareholder resolutions filed with U.S. publicly held corporations. This first-of-its-kind report lays out four concise sets of principles on governance, social issues, general sustainability and environmental performance to guide investors’ voting on specific resolutions addressing these topics.
Insurer Climate Risk Disclosure Survey 2012
Mar 06, 2013
This report summarizes responses from insurance companies to a survey on climate risk developed by the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC). In 2012 insurance regulators in California, New York and Washington required insurers that write in excess of $300 million in direct written premiums, and are licensed to operate in any of the three states, to disclose their climate-related risks using this survey. The aim of the survey and Ceres’ analysis of the responses is to provide regulators with substantive information about the risks to insurers posed by climate change, as well as steps insurers are taking in response to their understanding of climate change risks.
Power Forward: Why the World’s Largest Companies are Investing in Renewable Energy
Dec 10, 2012
This report shows that a majority of Fortune 100 companies have set a renewable energy commitment, a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction commitment or both. The trend is even stronger internationally, as more than two-thirds of Fortune’s Global 100 have set the same commitments.