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Change the Rules of the Game

Companies and investors need clear policies that reward sustainability performance. our capital market structures are biased towards short-term financial performance. The lack of carbon-reducing regulations in the U.S. for example has allowed companies to emit greenhouse gases at no cost, thus rewarding big emitters and penalizing more efficient businesses. Far greater sustainability gains can be achieved if smart policies are adopted that send clear market signals encouraging clean solutions with a long-term perspective.

Rules of the Game

Companies and investors need clear policies that reward sustainability performance. our capital market structures are biased towards short-term financial performance. The lack of carbon-reducing regulations in the U.S. for example has allowed companies to emit greenhouse gases at no cost, thus rewarding big emitters and penalizing more efficient businesses. Far greater sustainability gains can be achieved if smart policies are adopted that send clear market signals encouraging clean solutions with a long-term perspective.

Ceres will advocate for more sustainable policies in the U.S. and around the world as well as build investor and business support for policies and regulations that reduce sustainability risks and protect long-term interests.

How We Will Get There:

  1. Build business leader support for national and global climate and energy policies.
  2. Gain passage of a new international climate treaty, including a binding reduction target based on the latest scientific findings by the internationally-recognized IPCC.
  3. Eliminate tax incentives and government subsidies for fossil fuel technologies and carbon-intensive projects.
  4. Gain passage of energy efficiency policies to double the historic rate of efficiency improvements and national renewable policies so that at least 20 percent of the nation's electricity comes from renewable power by 2020 and 30 percent by 2030.
  5. Gain passage of national climate change legislation to achieve a reduction in GHG emissions of at least 25 percent below 1990 levels by 2020 and 80 percent by 2050.


Resources:

Investing in the Clean Trillion: Closing The Clean Energy Investment Gap Executive Summary
Jan 15, 2014
An executive summary of the Ceres report Investing in the Clean Trillion: Closing The Clean Energy Investment Gap.
Investing in the Clean Trillion: Closing The Clean Energy Investment Gap
Jan 15, 2014
In 2010 world governments agreed to limit the increase in global temperature to two degrees Celsius (2 °C) above pre-industrial levels to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. To have an 80 percent chance of maintaining this 2 °C limit, the IEA estimates an additional $36 trillion in clean energy investment is needed through 2050—or an average of $1 trillion more per year compared to a “business as usual” scenario over the next 36 years. This Ceres report provides 10 recommendations for investors, companies and policymakers to increase annual global investment in clean energy to at least $1 trillion by 2030—roughly a four-fold jump from current investment levels.
Building Climate Resilience in Cities: Priorities for Collaborative Action
Dec 05, 2013
This is one of three documents developed by insurance industry leaders and city stakeholders through the Building Climate Resilience in Cities workshop series convened by Ceres and ClimateWise in 2012 and 2013.
Inaction on Climate Change: The Cost to Taxpayers
Oct 28, 2013
When we examine the full costs of public programs that pay for disaster relief and recovery from extreme weather events—ad hoc disaster assistance appropriations, flood insurance, crop insurance, wildfire protection, and state run “residual market” insurance programs—we can begin to understand the price to U.S. taxpayers of inaction on climate change.
Assessing Water System Revenue Risk: Considerations for Market Analysts
Aug 07, 2013
Water utilities are on the brink of extraordinary investments to replace aging infrastructure—the Environmental Protection Agency estimates that by 2030, capital expenditures of more than $300 billion will be needed to safeguard drinking water. Yet this investment comes at a time when Americans’ water use habits are changing—resulting in considerable uncertainty for water systems planning capital programs to replace or expand their assets.