You are here: Home Resources Reports Electric Power
Document Actions
  • Print this Print this
  • Email this page

Electric Power

Ceres electric power related reports
Practicing Risk-Aware Electricity Regulation: 2014 Update
Nov 17, 2014
This 2014 update to Ceres' 2012 report, Practicing Risk-Aware Electricity Regulation: What Every State Regulator Needs to Know, looks at key trends that continue to reshape the U.S. electricity industry, analyzes changing costs and risk profiles of energy resources (especially renewable energy), and offers further insights and recommendations for smart, “risk-aware” decision-making by utility regulators.
Power Forward Supplement: Climate and Energy Targets set by Fortune 500 Companies
Jun 19, 2014
This table is a supplemental document listing all the goals to the report: Power Forward: How American Companies are Setting Clean Energy Targets and Capturing Greater Business Value.
Benchmarking Air Emissions of the 100 Largest Electric Power Producers in the United States 2014
May 28, 2014
This report examines and compares the stack air pollutant emissions of the 100 largest power producers in the United States based on their 2012 generation, plant ownership, and emissions data and shows a downward trend in nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxides (SO2), mercury and carbon dioxide (CO2) since 2000, with CO2 emissions decreasing 13 percent between 2008 and 2012.
Investing in the Clean Trillion: Closing The Clean Energy Investment Gap Executive Summary
Jan 15, 2014
An executive summary of the Ceres report Investing in the Clean Trillion: Closing The Clean Energy Investment Gap.
Investing in the Clean Trillion: Closing The Clean Energy Investment Gap
Jan 15, 2014
In 2010 world governments agreed to limit the increase in global temperature to two degrees Celsius (2 °C) above pre-industrial levels to avoid the worst impacts of climate change. To have an 80 percent chance of maintaining this 2 °C limit, the IEA estimates an additional $36 trillion in clean energy investment is needed through 2050—or an average of $1 trillion more per year compared to a “business as usual” scenario over the next 36 years. This Ceres report provides 10 recommendations for investors, companies and policymakers to increase annual global investment in clean energy to at least $1 trillion by 2030—roughly a four-fold jump from current investment levels.
Power Factor: Institutional Investors’ Policy Priorities Can Bring Energy Efficiency to Scale
May 21, 2013
Research shows climate change could impose a multi-trillion dollar burden on the global economy and contribute ten percent of overall risk within institutional investment portfolios. Institutional investors, who manage tens of trillions of dollars globally, are actively looking for ways to mitigate these climate-related risks. Energy efficiency offers one such opportunity for institutional investors to manage the risks of climate change while earning a competitive rate of return on their investment.
Benchmarking Air Emissions
May 15, 2013
This report analyzes the latest emissions from the 100 largest power producers in the U.S. The report shows that the electric industry cut emissions of NOx, SO2 and CO2 in 2011 even as overall electricity generation increased, largely due to increased use of natural gas and growing reliance on renewable energy.
Benchmarking Air Emissions of the 100 Largest Electric Power Producers in the United States 2012
Jul 31, 2012
A new report on U.S. power plant emissions from the top 100 power producers demonstrates the impact of the electric power industry’s current transition to cleaner energy sources.
Practicing Risk-Aware Electricity Regulation: What Every State Regulator Needs to Know
Apr 19, 2012
This report is primarily addressed to state regulatory utility commissioners, who will preside over some of the most important investments in the history of the U.S. electric power sector during perhaps its most challenging and tumultuous period. This report seeks to provide regulators with a thorough discussion of risk, and to suggest an approach—“risk-aware regulation”—whereby regulators can explicitly and proactively seek to identify, understand and minimize the risks associated with electric utility resource investment. It is hoped that this approach will result in the effcient deployment of capital, the continued financial health of utilities, and the confidence and satisfaction of the customers on whose behalf utilities invest.
New Jobs - Cleaner Air (Part II): An investment in American Businesses and American Jobs
Nov 17, 2011
In February 2011, Ceres issued a study demonstrating how new air pollution rules proposed for the electric power sector by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will provide long-term economic benefits across much of the United States. This report supplements this economic study by highlighting specific case examples of the companies involved in building a modern generating fleet. It breaks the supply chain into its component pieces and shows the vital role that American workers play in installing and maintaining sophisticated emission control systems.
Benchmarking Electric Utility Energy Efficiency Portfolios in the U.S.
Nov 10, 2011
The goal of this report is to highlight the importance—and the challenges—of benchmarking electric utility energy efficiency portfolios, and to initiate a benchmarking process that will continue to evolve over time. Benchmarking allows for direct comparison of spending and energy savings across electric utility energy efficiency portfolios. This report discusses the difficulties involved in benchmarking energy efficiency portfolios, evaluates and recommends a suite of metrics, and demonstrates these metrics using a diverse set of electric utilities.
New Jobs-Cleaner Air: Employment Effects under Planned Changes to EPA’s Air Pollution Rules
Feb 01, 2011
February 2011 - This study demonstrates how new air pollution rules proposed for the electric power sector by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will provide long-term economic benefits across much of the United States in the form of highly skilled, well paying jobs through infrastructure investment in the nation's generation fleet. Significantly, many of these jobs will be created over the next five years as the United States recovers from its severe economic downturn.
The Ripple Effect: Water Risk in the Municipal Bond Market
Oct 22, 2010
October 2010 - Growing water scarcity in many parts of the United States is a hidden financial risk for investors who buy the water and electric utility bonds that finance much of the country's vast water and power infrastructure, according to this first-ever report by Ceres and Water Asset Management. The report evaluates and ranks water scarcity risks for public water and power utilities in some of the country's most water-stressed regions, including Los Angeles, Phoenix, Dallas and Atlanta.
The 21st Century Electric Utility: Positioning for a Low-Carbon Future
Jul 27, 2010
July 2010 - This report identifies five key elements of a 21st century electric utility business model and makes specific recommendations to utilities as they transition to a low-carbon future. It is by no means the final word on this complex and constantly evolving subject. Rather it is a starting point for utilities, policymakers, regulators, investors, analysts, and advocates to consider the utility decisions and behaviors best suited to helping us realize the energy future we all want – a future that, as the report says, “minimizes cost, risk and environmental impact, and maximizes opportunity, options and societal benefit.”
Benchmarking Air Emissions of the 100 Largest Electric Power Producers in the United States 2010
Jun 14, 2010
June 2010 - The 2010 Benchmarking report is the seventh collaborative effort highlighting environmental performance and progress in the nation’s electric power sector. The Benchmarking series began in 1997 and uses publicly reported data to compare the emissions performance of the 100 largest power producers in the United States. The current report is based on 2008 generation and emissions data.
Climate Risk Disclosure in SEC Filings: An Analysis of 10K Reporting by Oil and Gas, Insurance, Coal, Transportation and Electric Power Companies
Jun 10, 2009
June 2009 - This Ceres/Environmental Defense Fund report evaluates the current state of climate risk disclosure by 100 global companies in five sectors that have a strong stake in preparing for a low carbon future: electric utilities, coal, oil and gas, transportation and insurance. It assesses climate risk disclosure in the SEC filings made by these companies in Q1 2008, and finds very limited disclosure.
Benchmarking Air Emissions of the 100 Largest Electric Power Producers in the United States
May 08, 2008
May 2008 - The 2008 Benchmarking report is the sixth collaborative effort highlighting environmental performance and progress in the nation’s electric power sector. The Benchmarking series began in 1997 and uses publicly reported data to compare the emissions performance of the 100 largest power producers in the United States. The current report is based on 2006 generation and emissions data.
Electric Utilities: Global Climate Disclosure Framework
Feb 08, 2008
February 2008 - The Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change (IIGCC, Europe), Ceres, which directs the Investor Network on Climate Risk (INCR, US), and the Investor Group on Climate Change (IGCC, Australia and New Zealand) have collaborated to develop a reporting framework which defines investors’ climate change-related disclosure expectations for electric utilities and power generators, specifically those involved in power generation.
TXU's Expansion Proposal: A Risk for Investors
Feb 06, 2007
February 2007 - The report concludes that TXU's investors &mdash whether as public shareholders or private investors - will face a multitude of financial risks if the company moves forward with its plans to build 9,000 megawatts of pulverized coal-fired capacity. The report cites construction cost over-runs, burdensome regulatory costs as climate regulations take hold and a slowing of power demand in Texas as state legislators aggressively push energy efficiency and other energy-saving programs.
Power to Save: An Alternative Path to Meet Electric Needs in Texas
Jan 06, 2007
January 2007 - This study finds that a comprehensive effort to promote efficiency and other cost-saving demand reduction measures can meet Texas' electricity needs more reliably, at a lower cost and at a tremendous net economic benefit compared to building a new fleet of expensive and heavily polluting power plants. Over the next 15 years, boosting markets for more efficient products, lighting, cooling, heating and industrial processes can eliminate over 80% of forecast growth in electricity demand, while lowering consumer's energy bills. With additional measures to further reduce electricity demand and enhance reliability, Texas can completely eliminate its "load growth," resulting in a gradual decline in total electricity demand to more than 9% below current levels by 2021.