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Water

Ceres brings unique capital market solutions to our water challenges. We are changing the way that businesses and utilities manage water, and the way that investors consider water risk in their investment decisions.

Faucet dripping waterWater makes life possible. It makes economies function. But, in many parts of the United States, freshwater resources are in jeopardy, creating profound long-term risks for businesses and communities.

Our water supplies are under severe strain due to growing demand, pollution and climate change. Re-thinking how we value water is a critical first step in reducing these strains and safeguarding future water supplies.

Water is a finite and precious resource, but our economic systems treat it as limitless and of little value. For many companies and other water users, their water bills are so small that it hardly seems worthwhile to conserve. The result is unsustainable water use across much of our economy—from industry to agriculture to homeowners.

Ceres brings unique capital market solutions to these challenges. We are changing the way that businesses and utilities manage water, and the way that investors consider water risk in their investment decisions. By reshaping how key economic actors value water, we can turn smart water management into a business fundamental and water stewardship into an economic imperative.

We focus on three key sectors with enormous responsibility for protecting our nation’s water security— water utilities, oil and gas, and agriculture. Taken together, these sectors are responsible for more than 90% of the nation’s water consumption. By improving their water management, we can build an economy that protects freshwater for the future.

Learn more

 

Reports:

The Ceres Roadmap for Sustainability: Revised Expectations
May 02, 2016
The Ceres Roadmap presents 20 expectations in the areas of governance, stakeholder engagement, disclosure, and performance that companies should seek to meet by 2020 in order to transform into truly sustainable enterprises. As we pass the halfway point on the road to 2020, it is an important time to take stock of our changing world and refresh the Ceres Roadmap expectations themselves to reflect global sustainability trends. View the revised expectations in this abbreviated, two-page resource.
View From the Top: How Corporate Boards Engage on Sustainability Performance
Oct 28, 2015
Corporate boards are responsible for overseeing the interests of shareholders in the long term and have a critical role to play in championing sustainability across the enterprise. Over the years, Wall Street research, academic papers, corporate reports and trends from major investors have all underscored the same message: Companies that adopt sustainable practices deliver superior financial results and can face the future with more resilience. Based on interviews conducted with dozens of corporate directors, senior corporate leaders and governance experts, this Ceres report, View from the top: How Corporate Boards Engage on Sustainability Performance identifies key strategies for effective board engagement that can produce tangible environmental and social impacts.
Water Connection Charges: A Tool for Encouraging Water-Efficient Growth
Aug 11, 2015
As many U.S. communities are struggling to support growing populations with limited water resources, very few of them are utilizing water connection charges to increase water-savvy residential development projects in their communities.
21st Century Engagement: Investor Strategies for Incorporating ESG Considerations into Corporate Interactions
May 28, 2015
21st Century Engagement: Investor Strategies for Incorporating ESG Considerations into Corporate Interactions is a guide for U.S. institutional investors on engaging with companies and policymakers on sustainability issues and includes tactics and case studies from 37 engagement experts spanning six countries.
Feeding Ourselves Thirsty: How the Food Sector is Managing Global Water Risks
May 07, 2015
In Feeding Ourselves Thirsty, Ceres takes a closer look at how the food sector is managing water risk. The report evaluates publicly available information on the water use, stewardship and policies of 37 major food sector companies in four industries: packaged food, beverage, meat and agricultural products. The report examines how water risks affect the profitability and competitive positioning of these companies using indicators and scoring drawn from the Ceres Aqua Gauge.
Bond Financing Distributed Water systems: How to Make Better Use of Our Most Liquid Market for Financing Water infrastructure
Sep 02, 2014
Water utilities are at a crossroads. in the years ahead, they will have to invest billions in their infrastructure simply to catch up on backlogged repairs—and billions more to accommodate growing demands and changing hydrologic conditions.
Measuring & Mitigating Water Revenue Variability: Understanding How Pricing Can Advance Conservation Without Undermining Utilities’ Revenue Goals
Jul 10, 2014
As water utilities across North America undertake capital campaigns to finance the replacement and expansion of their systems, the need for confident revenue projections grows.
Water and Climate Risks Facing U.S. Corn Production: How Companies and Investors Can Cultivate Sustainability
Jun 11, 2014
This report provides new data and interactive maps on the risks facing U.S. corn production, as well as detailed recommendations for how corn-buying companies and their investors can catalyze more sustainable agricultural practices that will reduce these risks, preserve and enhance yields, and protect precious water resources.
Gaining Ground: Corporate Progress on the Ceres Roadmap for Sustainability
Apr 30, 2014
This report evaluates how well 613 of the largest, publicly traded U.S. companies are integrating sustainability into their business systems and decision-making. The report— a collaboration between Ceres and Sustainalytics—assesses corporate progress across the four strategic areas first outlined in 2010 in the Ceres Roadmap for Sustainability.
Hydraulic Fracturing & Water Stress: Water Demand by the Numbers
Feb 05, 2014
This Ceres research paper analyzes escalating water demand in hydraulic fracturing operations across the United States and western Canada. It evaluates oil and gas company water use in eight regions with intense shale energy development and the most pronounced water stress challenges.