E-mail Sign-up
 
You are here: Home Ceres Conference Speakers Sharlene Leurig
Document Actions
  • Print this Print this
  • Email this page

Sharlene Leurig

Sharlene directs the Sustainable Water Infrastructure Program at Ceres, a national nonprofit helping institutional investors to integrate sustainability into the capital markets. With Ceres, she works with water service providers to build business models that are resilient to weather extremes, climate change and resource depletion.
Sharlene Leurig

Director, Water Program, Ceres

Sharlene directs the Sustainable Water Infrastructure Program at Ceres, a national nonprofit helping institutional investors to integrate sustainability into the capital markets. With Ceres, she works with water service providers to build business models that are resilient to weather extremes, climate change and resource depletion.

She also works closely with bond investors to develop credit risk assessment methods that appropriately value sustainable water governance and resource management, and to construct criteria for investment vehicles that will channel capital toward sustainable water systems.

Before coming to Ceres, she was a fellow in the MIT-USGS Science Impact Collaborative at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where she focused on the role of science in multi-stakeholder resource planning and dispute resolution.

In her spare time, Sharlene writes about the springs of Texas on her blog Hell's Oasis, and serves on the Board of Directors of the Hill Country Alliance, which works to preserve the spectacular beauty and culture of the Texas Hill Country for the benefit of future generations. She also sits on the Advisory Council of the Environmental Science Institute at University of Texas at Austin.

She holds a BA in Physics and English from Washington University in St. Louis and a Master in City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Recent Blog Posts

National Geographic

Does Water Conservation Have To Be The Enemy Of Financial Stability?

by Sharlene LeurigNational Geographic Posted on Jul 16, 2014

Pricing is a powerful tool for shaping behavior, including water use. Recognizing the power of pricing, more water utilities are adopting water rates designed to encourage customers to conserve.

National Geographic

California’s Drought: Cheap Water, But No Free Lunch

by Sharlene LeurigNational Geographic Posted on Feb 14, 2014

Today, President Obama visited California’s Central Valley, which may be in the midst of the driest winter in centuries.

National Geographic

The Good News and Bad News of Declining Water Demand

by Sharlene LeurigNational Geographic Posted on Aug 08, 2013

Water utilities across the United States are planning major infrastructure investments in the coming decades. How much? The Environmental Protection Agency estimates about $300 billion will need to be spent by 2030 to keep our drinking water systems safe.

American Rivers

The End of Cheap Water?

by Sharlene LeurigAmerican Rivers Posted on Jul 01, 2013

The costs of rebuilding our nation’s water infrastructure are jaw dropping: estimates range from $300 billion to $1 trillion needed over the next 30 years.

Summit Daily News

Writers On The Range: Big water projects should make Westerners queasy

by Sharlene LeurigSummit Daily News Posted on Jan 23, 2013

Across maps of the arid West, expensive water pipelines are being plotted to meet the region's profound need for water. But what if there's not enough demand for water to pay for these projects?

Filed under: