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Meg Wilcox

Meg rejoined Ceres as a senior manager of Communications in January 2014, after a two-year hiatus as senior manager of Communications at Root Capital. Meg first began working for Ceres’ communications team in 2008. She handles media relations and external communications projects, focusing especially on BICEP communications and climate and energy policy.
Meg Wilcox

Senior Manager, Communications

Meg rejoined Ceres as a senior manager of Communications in January 2014, after a two-year hiatus as senior manager of Communications at Root Capital.  Meg first began working for Ceres’ communications team in 2008. She handles media relations and external communications projects, focusing especially on BICEP communications and climate and energy policy.

At Root Capital, a nonprofit social investment fund, Meg led media relations and messaging for external communications and marketing, and also developed multimedia projects. Previously she worked as a manager of communications at Environment Northeast, a regional nonprofit, energy advocacy organization.

Meg began her career in public health and later worked as a freelance writer. Her articles on the environment have appeared in the Boston Globe, Cape Codder and other community newspapers.

She has a B.S. in Environmental Studies from Cornell University and a S.M. in Environmental Health from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Recent Blog Posts

National Geographic

Corn Belt Pollution: Louisiana Shrimp And Oysters Pay The Price

by Meg WilcoxNational Geographic Posted on Oct 21, 2014

Coastal Louisiana faces a complex web of environmental challenges from land loss, to declining fisheries, water quality problems and climate change.

National Geographic

Tamping Down On Water Use In Drought Stricken California

by Meg WilcoxNational Geographic Posted on Apr 24, 2014

The Dawn Creek subdivision in Lancaster, 60 miles north of Los Angeles, looks like any other neighborhood scattered across California’s Antelope Valley. But Dawn Creek contains a home like no other in the country—a so-called Double ZeroHouse that is so highly energy and water efficient that it uses zero electricity from the grid and less than half the water of an average home.