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Meg Wilcox

As a senior manager of communications, Meg develops and manages communication strategies to support Ceres’ goals focused on climate policy, water scarcity and sustainable agriculture. Her focal areas are media relations and messaging.
Meg Wilcox

Senior Manager, Communications

As a senior manager of communications, Meg develops and manages communication strategies to support Ceres’ goals focused on climate policy, water scarcity and sustainable agriculture. Her focal areas are media relations and messaging.

Meg first began working for Ceres communications team in 2008, concentrating then on communications for the Investor Network on Climate Risk. After a two-year hiatus at Root Capital, she rejoined Ceres in 2014.

At the nonprofit social investment fund, Root Capital, Meg led media relations and messaging for external communications and marketing. She also developed multimedia projects. Meg has also worked in communications at the Acadia Center, a regional energy advocacy organization, and at the Northeast Waste Management Officials Association, where she developed and implemented social marketing and communications campaigns on mercury waste management.

Meg began her career in environmental health and later worked as a freelance writer. Her articles on the environment have appeared in the Boston Globe, National Geographic Voices, Greenbiz, The Cape Codder and New Solutions. She has a B.S. in Environmental Studies from Cornell University and a S.M. in Environmental Health from the Harvard School of Public Health. She speaks Spanish and is an avid photographer.

Recent Blog Posts

Water Deeply

Worms and Wine? Fetzer Vineyards First to Adopt Innovative Wastewater Treatment System to Save Water / Combat Climate Change

by Meg WilcoxWater Deeply Posted on Apr 06, 2016

It takes a lot of water to make a glass of California wine, anywhere from two to 15 gallons of water, according to recent studies. And as the state moves into its fifth year of drought, many California wineries are rethinking how they use water and the way they do business.

Ensia

How Can We Ensure the Race for Clean Energy Doesn't Leave the World's Poorest Citizens Behind?

by Meg WilcoxEnsia Posted on Apr 04, 2016

Wind power is booming in Mexico. With more than 3,200 megawatts in operation, the country is on par with Japan. By 2018 it expects to have 10,000 MW installed as part of the government’s Climate Action Plan. Promising, right?

National Geographic

Farm Water Management Lessons from the Desert

by Meg WilcoxNational Geographic Posted on Sep 25, 2015

Year-round warm temperatures and decades of smart water planning have earned the state its place in the market. Unlike California, however, Arizona is not currently facing a water crisis, even though it too is enduring prolonged drought.

National Geographic

A Farm Level View on Supply Chain Water Risk

by Meg WilcoxNational Geographic Posted on Jun 04, 2015

Lettuce is a thirsty crop in parched California. It takes roughly 12 gallons to grow a single head, and Chris Willoughby, a mid-sized grower of leafy greens, broccoli and cabbage, is doing his best to cut back on that amount.

National Geographic

Corn Belt Pollution: Louisiana Shrimp And Oysters Pay The Price

by Meg WilcoxNational Geographic Posted on Oct 21, 2014

Coastal Louisiana faces a complex web of environmental challenges from land loss, to declining fisheries, water quality problems and climate change.